Biographies

 

  Ahmed Abdel Latif, an Egyptian national,  is Programme Manager for Intellectual Property and Sustainable Development at the International Institute for Trade and Sustainable Development. He earned a LLM. Public International Law (Merit), University of London,  London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) with a Specialization in United Nations Law and Treaty Law; a B.A. in Political Science - International Relations (Cum Laude), American University in Cairo; and the Diploma in International Relations of the Institute of Political Studies – Paris (Sciences-Po). As career diplomat, he has worked at the Permanent Mission of Egypt to the United Nations - Geneva (2000-2004) where he was a delegate to the TRIPS Council of the World Trade Organization and to the World Intellectual Property Organization as well as coordinator of the African Group at WIPO (2004). He has written "Developing Country Coordination in International Intellectual Property Standard-setting," (T.R.A.D.E Working Paper 24, South Centre, June 2005)
 
  Thiru Balasubramaniam is the Geneva Representative for Knowledge 
Ecology International.  Prior to his post as KEI’s Geneva  Representative, Mr. Balasubramaniam worked at Health Action  International in Colombo and at the World Health Organization in  Geneva as a technical officer in the Department of Essential Drugs and  Medicines Policy dealing with access to medicines and intellectual  property. During his first year at WHO, he was a Global Health Leadership Fellow, supported by the Rockefeller Foundation and the  United Nations Foundation. He began his career with CPTech working on  issues related to health care and intellectual property. Mr. Balasubramaniam, who is a Sri Lankan national, holds B.A. degree  in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania.
 
brown Peter Brown graduated as a Mechanical Engineer and worked for Glaxo and later Glaxo International, managing projects for pharmaceutical production facilities in UK, Brazil, France and Spain.  He set up and sold business in South Africa and the UK in manufacture and technical publishing.  Latterly Peter has worked on a projects related to the design of methodologies and software systems for data management of pharmaceutical companies and other R&D intensive businesses.   This led to exploring the value of the clinical development records using statistical methods so that funding could be raised by means of securitisation on capital markets.  Currently Peter’s work is focused on SecureAid and the need to structure large scale, long term funds for medicines neglected by commercial markets, harnessing established capital market techniques and backed by a group of advisors.
 
chalkidou Kalipso Chalkidou, M.D., Ph.D., a 2007–08 Commonwealth Fund Harkness Fellow in Health Care Policy and Practice, is associate director of research and development at NICE, where her work includes disinvestment guidance, evaluation of fast-tracking appraisals of technologies closer to licensing, and the review of social value judgments used by NICE committees. Previous positions include clinical research fellow at the University of Newcastle Medical School and surgical trainee in NHS hospitals in Newcastle and Cambridge. She has authored peer-reviewed articles in basic science, clinical medicine, and health policy, with publications in the BMJ, Health Economics, and the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, as well as a book chapter on economic evaluation in public health. Chalkidou graduated with distinction from the Athens Medical School in 2000 and holds a doctorate in prostate cancer from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. She is an honorary lecturer in health policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and was recently awarded a two-year grant from the Sasakawa Foundation to study current applications of pharmacoeconomics in Japan.
 
  Michelle Childs, KEI's Head of European Affairs is based in London, but regularly travels to Brussels to lobby the European Institutions and to Geneva to lobby UN insitutions. She works with NGO's throughout Europe on Access to Medicine and Access to Knowledge issues. Prior to working for KEI, she was Head of Policy Research and Analysis at the Consumers' Association UK. She was a consultant to the Hong Kong Telecoms Regulator and a policy adviser at OFTEL (the UK telecoms regulator). She started her career as a solicitor at a city of London law firm. 
 
 
Pierre Chirac (1959) is a public health pharmacist, section editor at the French medical journal Prescrire, advisor for the MSF's Campaign for access to essential medicines since its beginning.
 
clift Charles Clift has had a great deal of experience in the U.K. Department for International Development (DFID), where he works principally as an economist on all aspects of DFID’s work. He began his career as an agricultural economist, advising DFID on its agricultural research priorities. He has lived and worked in Africa, the Caribbean, and India. He has also been responsible for the management of DFID’s economic and social research, and the coordination of all of DFID’s research programmes, including those concerned with health and agriculture. From 2001 to 2002, he acted as Head of the Secretariat of the U.K. Commission on Intellectual Property Rights (www.iprcommission.org). From 2004 to 2006, he was employed in a similar capacity by the WHO Commission on Intellectual Property Rights, Innovation and Public Health (www.who.int/intellectualproperty).
 
Davis Lee N. Davis is Associate Professor at the Department of Innovation
and Organizational Economics at the Copenhagen Business School (CBS).
She is also Research Associate at the Center on Law, Economics and
Financial Institutions, and the Research Center on Biotech Business,
both at CBS. From 1995-1998 she directed CBS's International Business
program. Prior to joining CBS she was a Research Fellow at the Danish
Technical University. Her research and teaching have focused on
innovation strategy and management, and the role of intellectual
property rights. Her main research interests include: what motivates
inventors to invent (including the role of alternative economic
incentive systems such as prizes), how firms capture the profits from
their investments in R&D, the appropriability aspects of university-
business relationships in biotechnology, and the new perspectives on
innovation strategy and appropriability raised by advances in digital
technologies.
 
 

.John W. Erickson has a passion for discovering and developing new drugs. He has been engaged in the rational design and development of drugs to treat HIV/AIDS since the mid-1980’s, when he first joined Abbott Labs after brief stint as a faculty member at the University of Wisconsin Medical School. He has built and led exceptionally productive drug discovery groups in the pharmaceutical industry, government, and biotechnology sectors, and his research teams have produced several ground-breaking drugs for AIDS therapy that have resulted in over $1 billion in revenues in the global market.

Dr. Erickson has broad-based scientific expertise in structural biology, virology, bioinformatics, medicinal chemistry, and structure-based drug design. 

At Abbott, Dr. Erickson was the recipient of a major AIDS grant from the NIH, which he used to establish a multidisciplinary antiviral drug discovery program for the design of HIV protease inhibitors. Erickson’s team invented a class of molecules that incorporated a novel symmetric architecture, which was designed to structurally complement the symmetric active site of the enzyme. Based on his invention, Abbott’s antiviral program ultimately went on to develop two FDA approved PIs: Ritonavir and Lopinavir (Kaletra). He was elected to Abbott’s prestigious Volwiler Society and received Abbott’s President’s Award for his contributions.
In 1991, Dr. Erickson was recruited by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to establish a multidisciplinary research team in drug design. With his new research team, Dr. Erickson elucidated the structural and biochemical mechanisms of drug resistance to HIV protease inhibitors, and discovered and patented a breakthrough class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors, including TMC-114, active against multi-drug resistant HIV strains. The NCI licensed this technology to Tibotec-Virco, NV, which, in 1999, recruited Dr. Erickson to establish a collaborative R&D drug discovery subsidiary of Tibotec in the US. In 2002, Tibotec acquired by J&J, which is currently funding the clinical development of TMC-114.
In late 2002, Dr. Erickson founded Sequoia Pharmaceuticals, a privately financed company, and the Institute for Global Therapeutics, a 501c3 public charity. Sequoia is developing a novel series of resistant-repellent HIV protease inhibitors designed to both treat and prevent new drug resistant HIV infections. The Institute is focused on developing affordable new medicines and approaches to treat global HIV/AIDS.
Dr. Erickson earned a B.A. in Biology from SUNY at Buffalo, a M.S. in Molecular Biology from Vanderbilt University, and a Ph.D. in Virology from The University of Western Ontario. He has authored over 140 research papers, is an inventor on over 30 patents, and is a frequent invited speaker at national and international meetings on HIV/AIDS and drug design. has a passion for discovering and developing new drugs. He has been engaged in the rational design and development of drugs to treat HIV/AIDS since the mid-1980’s, when he first joined Abbott Labs after brief stint as a faculty member at the University of Wisconsin Medical School. He has built and led exceptionally productive drug discovery groups in the pharmaceutical industry, government, and biotechnology sectors, and his research teams have produced several ground-breaking drugs for AIDS therapy that have resulted in over $1 billion in revenues in the global market. Dr. Erickson has broad-based scientific expertise in structural biology, virology, bioinformatics, medicinal chemistry, and structure-based drug design. 

At Abbott, Dr. Erickson was the recipient of a major AIDS grant from the NIH, which he used to establish a multidisciplinary antiviral drug discovery program for the design of HIV protease inhibitors. Erickson’s team invented a class of molecules that incorporated a novel symmetric architecture, which was designed to structurally complement the symmetric active site of the enzyme. Based on his invention, Abbott’s antiviral program ultimately went on to develop two FDA approved PIs: Ritonavir and Lopinavir (Kaletra). He was elected to Abbott’s prestigious Volwiler Society and received Abbott’s President’s Award for his contributions.

In 1991, Dr. Erickson was recruited by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to establish a multidisciplinary research team in drug design. With his new research team, Dr. Erickson elucidated the structural and biochemical mechanisms of drug resistance to HIV protease inhibitors, and discovered and patented a breakthrough class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors, including TMC-114, active against multi-drug resistant HIV strains. The NCI licensed this technology to Tibotec-Virco, NV, which, in 1999, recruited Dr. Erickson to establish a collaborative R&D drug discovery subsidiary of Tibotec in the US. In 2002, Tibotec acquired by J&J, which is currently funding the clinical development of TMC-114.
In late 2002, Dr. Erickson founded Sequoia Pharmaceuticals, a privately financed company, and the Institute for Global Therapeutics, a 501c3 public charity. Sequoia is developing a novel series of resistant-repellent HIV protease inhibitors designed to both treat and prevent new drug resistant HIV infections. The Institute is focused on developing affordable new medicines and approaches to treat global HIV/AIDS.
Dr. Erickson earned a B.A. in Biology from SUNY at Buffalo, a M.S. in Molecular Biology from Vanderbilt University, and a Ph.D. in Virology from The University of Western Ontario. He has authored over 140 research papers, is an inventor on over 30 patents, and is a frequent invited speaker at national and international meetings on HIV/AIDS and drug design.

 
franz Vera Franz is Program Manager at the Open Society Institute's Information Program (www.soros.org/ip) since November 2001, heading the Program on Intellectual Property Rights Reform and Open Knowledge. In parallel, she has been lecturing a course on 'Media, Technologies, and Globalisation' at the Department of Communications at Salzburg University, Austria. Previously, she was affiliated with the Austrian Techno-Z R&D Institute, researching information market developments for the European Commission. She has lived in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina, running Internet projects for local non-governmental organisations. Vera holds a Masters in Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and a MagPhil in Political Science at Salzburg University, Austria.
 
ghosh Rishab Aiyer Ghosh leads several research projects on Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS) at UNU-MERIT. He was one of the founders and is the current managing editor of First Monday, a peer-reviewed Internet journal that covers internet economics, law and technology.

 
 

Ove Granstrand was educated at Chalmers University of Technology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden and Stanford University with graduate degrees in mathematics, economics and engineering and a PhD degree in industrial management and economics. His work experience includes teaching, research and consultancy in various Eastern and Western countries. He serves as Professor in Industrial Management and Economics at Chalmers University of Technology and is founder of CIP – Center for Intellectual Property Studies at Chalmers. His research interest concerns economics and management of technology and innovation. In particular, he has studied innovation, corporate strategy and diversification in multi-technology corporations in Europe, Japan and the USA, as well as various issues related to R&D, intellectual property and intellectual capital more generally. He has authored and edited several books and articles on these topics, recent ones being The Economics and Management of Intellectual Property – Towards Intellectual Capitalism (Edward Elgar, 2000); Economics, Law and Intellectual Property. (Editor), Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 2003; The Economics and Management of Technological Diversification. Co-edited with Cantwell, J. and Gambardella, A. (Routledge, London, 2004); Bringing Technology and Innovation into the Boardroom. Palgrave Publ., 2004 (Chapters and editorial contributions to a book co-authored with European Institute of Technology and Innovation Management).

 
 

Aidan Hollis is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Calgary. He holds a BA from Cambridge University and a PhD from the University of Toronto. He has published widely in economics, with a particular focus on pharmaceutical markets and intellectual property. For the academic year 2003-4 he was appointed TD MacDonald Chair of Industrial Economics at the Canadian Competition Bureau. He has been involved in developing economic analyses of prize mechanisms for pharmaceutical innovation over the past four years.

 
  James Love is an advisor to a number of UN agencies, national governments, international and regional intergovernmental organizations and public health NGOs. He is also the United States co-chair of the Trans-Atlantic Consumer Dialogue (TACD) Working Group on Intellectual Property, Chairman of Essential Inventions, and a member of the board of directors for the Union for the Public Domain, the Civil Society Coalition, and a member of the MSF working groups on Intellectual Property Research and Development and of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) Task Force on Intellectual Property. Mr. Love was previously Senior Economist for the Frank Russell Company, a lecturer at Rutgers University, and a researcher on international finance at Princeton University. He holds a Masters of Public Administration from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and a Masters in Public Affairs from Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
 
 

Stephen Merrill has been Executive Director of the National Academies’ Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) since its formation in 1991.  With the sponsorship of numerous federal government agencies, foundations, multinational corporations, and international institutions, the STEP program has become an important discussion forum and authoritative voice on technical standards, trade, taxation, human resources, and statistical as well as research and development policies.  At the same time Dr. Merrill has directed or co-directed several STEP projects and publications, including A Patent System for the 21st Century (2004) and Reaping the Benefits of Genomic and Proteomic Research: Intellectual Property, Innovation, and Public Health (2005).  For his work on the former project he was named one of the 50 most influential people worldwide in the intellectual property field by Managing Intellectual Property magazine and earned the Academies’ 2005 Distinguished Service Award.   Previously, Dr. Merrill was a Fellow in International Business at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where he specialized in technology trade issues.  From 1975 until 1981 he served on various congressional staffs. Dr. Merrill holds degrees in political science from Columbia (B.A.), Oxford (M. Phil.), and Yale (M.A. and Ph.D.) Universities. 

 
  Suerie Moon is a Research Fellow at Harvard's Center for International
Development, a doctoral candidate in the Public Policy Program at
Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, and a member of the Harvard
branch of Universities Allied for Essential Medicines. Her research
interests include the role of international civil society in global
governance; access to medicines and intellectual property rights
policies; and equity in public health in the developing world. Prior
to coming to Harvard, she was a campaigner, researcher, and writer for
the  Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF)
international Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines, where she
focused on intellectual property rights, equity prices for medicines,
and research and development into 'neglected diseases.' She holds a
Masters in Public Affairs, with a focus on international relations,
from the  Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at
Princeton University, and a BA from Yale University.
 
reynolds Dr. David Reynolds is the Senior Policy Advisor for Health for U. S. Senator Bernard Sanders of Vermont, since his election in 2006. Dr. Reynolds received his Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Public Health from the University of Michigan, specializing in health policy.  His dissertation topic was “An Analysis of the Political & Economic Viability of Community Health Centers: Implications for Their Future.” Dr. Reynolds is a past recipient of a Pew Foundation Fellowship in Health Policy (1984) and an International Leadership Fellowship from the Kellogg Foundation (1995). Dr. Reynolds has served as chair of Vermont’s Medicaid Advisory Board and as a member of the state’s Health Resources Allocation Plan Advisory Committee, which developed Vermont’s health care plan to guide state policy in the future.  In 2004, he was inducted in the first cohort of members of the National Association of Community Health Centers’ Grassroots Advocacy Hall of Fame. This was based on his founding and leading Northern Counties Health Care, Inc., a  NGA, community-based organization in rural northeastern Vermont.  NCHC is a network of six community health centers, two dental practices, and a home care and hospice agency.  Begun in 1976, NCHC is the only provider of primary care, dental care, and prescription drugs  for 20,000 residents.

 
rovira Joan Rovira is Professor at the Department of Economics, University of Barcelona. He has been lecturing and doing research and consulting mainly in the areas of economic evaluation of health technologies, pricing and financing of pharmaceuticals, drug market regulation and the economics of tobacco. He worked from 2001 to 2004 as Senior Health Economist for Pharmaceuticals at the Department of Human Development of the World Bank, Washington. He worked in the past as a short term professional at the WHO European Office in Copenhagen, as acting Officer for Health Economics and has been regularly a consultant on health policy and economics for the WHO, the PAHO, the IDB and the European Commission.  His experiences with developing countries include Eastern European (Moldova, Romania) and Latin American countries  (Panama, Brazil), Burkina Faso and Indonesia. He has been President of the Spanish Health Economist Association, and served at the Board of Directors of ISPOR. His present areas of interest include economic evaluation of health technologies, modeling disease processes, economics of smoking, health systems financing, differential pricing, generic drug policies, efficient procurement mechanisms, local production, and other topics related to the accessibility to drugs.

 
shah Dilip G Shah has 40 years of varied experience in the pharmaceutical industry and currently holds the following positions: Member of the Management Committee of the International Generic Pharmaceutical Alliance (IGPA), Secretary-General of the Indian Pharmaceutical Alliance (IPA), an Association of 15 large research based national companies.  Together they service about one-third of the domestic market, account for one-third of exports and contribute 90 per cent of R & D spending in the pharmaceutical industry, member, The World Bank Generics Consultative Group, Co-chairman of the FICCI's Committee on Pharmaceuticals, member of the Board of Advisors of Pharmabiz.com (Weekly), Member of the Advisory Panel for the Business Briefing: PharmaGenerics, U.K., Editor, Asia and India, Journal of Generic Medicines, U.K., CEO, Vision Consulting Group, a firm specialized in strategic planning (http://www.vision-india.com). Author of the first book on “Drug Pricing in India” and occasional contributor to business press, he graduated from the premier business school in India, Indian Institute of Management (IIM), Ahmedabad, and has been a guest faculty for their Management Development Programmes.

 
  Nicole Szlezak has been a member of Prize4Life's team since the
organization's formal establishment in 2006. She formerly served as the
organization's Chief Scientific Officer and is now a member of the board
of directors. Szlezak is currently a research fellow at Harvard's
Center for International Development and a doctoral candidate in
Public Policy at Harvard. Her work is broadly concerned with
issues of institutional architecture and governance in the global health
domain, with a special interest in the various new institutional
approaches that have recently been put forward to stimulate R&D and
innovation in the field of neglected and orphan diseases. Before coming
to Harvard, she was a clinical researcher at the Institute of Tropical
Medicine in Tuebingen, Germany, and a science writer contributing to
major German print media. She holds a medical degree from Humboldt
University in Berlin, a Master's Degree in Public Administration (MPA) from Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government, and a doctoral degree in medicine (Dr. med. degree) from the University of Tuebingen, Germany.
 
Dwayne Spradlin is President and Chief Executive Officer of InnoCentive, Inc. Previously, he served as President at business information company Hoover's Inc. and before that he was President and Chief Operating Officer of Starcite, Inc., an online meeting and events planning business. Spradlin served as Senior Vice President of Corporate and Business Development for Verticalnet Inc., the world's largest portfolio of online industry marketplaces. Earlier, Spradlin was a Director in the E-Business and Emerging Technology practice at PriceWaterhouseCoopers. He holds a BA in Applied Mathematics and an MBA from the University of Chicago. He resides in Southlake, TX with his wife and three sons.